Greener Pastures

Greener Pastures

12 Responses to “Greener Pastures”

  • Jonathan says:

    Any chance we’ll get to see a picture of you riding the new Bryant? I seem to recall many images of you on the LHT and Sam Hillborne as the years have passed, but none yet of the new ride. It looks like a much more aggressive posture, with the bars a hair below the saddle, so I’m curious to see how it fits you.

  • Alan says:

    @Jonathan

    I’ll have to recruit my wife to take a pic one of these days.

    Regarding the bar position, the kickstand lifts the rear wheel off of the ground 3.5″ which makes them look somewhat lower than they are. The tops are a few millimeters higher than the tip of the saddle, which actually places them slightly higher than the flat bars I had on the Surly, though the reach forward is a bit further. They are about 1cm lower than the Moustache bars on the Hillborne, but the reach is shorter than on that bike. At least on the tops and hoods, the position is right in the ballpark with the other bikes.

    Alan

  • Greg says:

    Allan – nice photo! I just ordered a Bryant myself…can’t wait for it to arrive next week. Which fenders do you have on yours (could you send a link)? Any advice on which ones to go with? I really like the VO Hammered look as well, but I’m not sure how they would pair with the Braynt. Thoughts?

  • Alan says:

    Hi Greg,

    Thanks!

    Congrats on your new bike. Did you get the Alfine belt?

    The fenders are the Civia Market fenders in Pewter; http://civiacycles.com/components/market_fenders/

    I considered Honjos, but I too wasn’t sure about pairing what to my eye are vintage-style fenders with such a modern bike. I’m sure the V/O’s or Honjos would look very nice, but I felt the Civia fenders were perhaps a better aesthetic match on this bike.

    One thing to consider.. the Civia fenders will require a modification to the front left-hand stay to clear the disc brake caliper. It’s not a big deal, but they’re not a straight bolt-on part. You’ll need to bend the stay a bit, and use a longer mounting bolt with a sleeve to get the stay out and around the caliper. You should be able to pick up an alloy sleeve and longer mounting bolt at your local hardware store.

    Honjos/VO fenders will not likely require this modification because their stays angle downward away from the caliper (see below).

    Regards,
    Alan

  • Greg says:

    Thanks Allan!

    Yes, I did get the Alfine belt. Can’t wait to take it for a ride next week.

    I agree with you completely in regards to the classic aesthetics of the VO or Honjos hammered fenders not pairing as well with the a more modern looking bike. I will probably go with the Civia Market fenders as well for now.

    Thanks for the installation advice as well. I would never have thought of that. Sounds like an easy enough work around. I will be in touch if I have any difficulty.

  • Mel Hughes says:

    What a lovely skyscape! It looks as though we have gone from snow, to tornadoes, to instant summer and hazy, late summer skies far too quickly.

    I am really admiring the Tubus/Pass & Stow combination you have on the Bryant. A trip to work last weekend cleary demonstrated to me how poorly I understood the carrying capacity of my Nitto M-12 and M-14 racks. I am going to have to rethink how I carry basic cycling supplies that normally live in a seat bag. My Acorn bag and the Nitto R-14 don’t play well together. The M-12 really does need either a basket or the M1 front flat rack to be able to juggle work stuff. Hmmm. I guess it’s always a work in progress.

  • Alan says:

    Hi Mel,

    For someone with my needs, I can’t really imagine improving upon that rack combination. I need one full-sized office-type bag in back for carrying a laptop, change of clothes, work papers, electronic devices, keys, wallet, etc. I also sometimes mount a grocery pannier on the opposite side for stopping on the way home. Up front, I need another spot for carrying lunch, tools, and layers as it warms up through the day. The Tubus with the Arkel Bug in back and the Pass & Stow with the Freight Baggage up front have been perfect for my needs. I can imagine a less robust combination working fine if I didn’t need to carry so much stuff, but for larger loads the heavy duty racks are very nice.

    Alan

  • Greg says:

    Alan,

    Do you have any close up photos of your front left fender mount? I just got my Civia Market fenders and I plan on mounting them today. I’m interested to see how you bent your stay to get around the disc brakes.

    Also, did you shorten the stay length on the front right and mount it on the back hole or did you need to use a longer bolt to reach the front hole since the fork is in the way. The mounting bolts that came with the fenders seem too short to reach the front hole.

    Thanks!

    Greg

  • Alan says:

    Hi Greg,

    Here’s the best photo I have right now:

    http://www.ecovelo.info/images/gallery-bryant-12-1000.jpg

    We’re heading out the door in a little while or I’d take some more shots for you. I’ll check this thread later today when we get home to see how it went for you.

    The fenders struts should be attached to the rear eyelets on the fork which will require trimming the stays – this is normal. You’ll need to trim those on the rear fender as well.

    The part that you see in the above photo is from Axiom, and unfortunately, is unavailable as an aftermarket item. As an alternative, you can pick up a long mounting bolt and an aluminum sleeve at your local hardware store to get the left-hand stay out, away from the disc caliper. You’ll still need to bend the stay to get the correct angle. It takes some experimentation to get it right.

    Good luck!

    Alan

  • Greg says:

    Alan,

    Thanks for the photo and advice. I attempted the fender job, but I didn’t finish it today. I’ll need to pick up the longer bolt as well.

    I noticed the silver metal mounting strip (not sure what it’s called?) that holds up the rear fender behind the seat post needs to be bent to form around the fender. Is there a “right” way to do this? My wife’s Trek Soho DLX came with fenders and her strip looks perfectly formed to hold up the rear fender.

    Also, I noticed that I will need to remove the rear tire to access the lower mounting eyelet near the peddles on the lower part of the frame. How do I remove the rear tire without affecting the tension on the belt-drive? I am new to working on bikes and belt-drives, so this is all new to me.

    Thanks again for you help and advice!

    Greg

  • Alan says:

    Hi Greg,

    On the brake bridge fender mount, it’s simply a matter of bending the tabs over to match the contour of the fender. To start, leave the tabs loose enough that the fender can slide through the mount. Then, once you have the fender in its final location, use a pair of smooth nosed pliers to pinch the tabs closed, locking the fender in place.

    You’re right, you’ll need to remove the rear wheel to install the fender mounting bolt at the bottom bracket. Look at this as an opportunity to learn how to remove the rear wheel before you get your first flat.

    Gates has a number of documents and videos on their website that provide information about belt alignment and tensioning:

    http://www.carbondrivesystems.com

    View the docs and videos on the Installation and FAQ pages before you attempt to remove the rear wheel. You might also want to order a belt tension gauge (Universal Cycles stocks them). If you don’t want to invest in a tension gauge, you can use a 10 lb. weight to check belt tension as per the instructions on the Gates site.

    Civia also has a number of instructional videos related to IGH and belt drives on their site:

    http://www.carbondrivesystems.com/installation.php?lang=us

    You’ll need to disengage the IGH shifter cable to remove the wheel. Start by shifting to 1st gear, then remove tension on the cable by pulling the STI barrel adjuster (located at the base of the head tube) out of its stop. Once the STI adjuster is disengaged, there will be a couple of inches of slack in the cable which makes disengaging the cable at the hub very easy.

    This isn’t much more complicated than working with derailleur drivetrains, but it’ll seem foreign at first. If it’s intimidating, you could always ask your LBS to do the work and see if they’d mind you looking over their shoulder so you know how to remove and re-install the wheel next time.

    Alan

  • Greg says:

    Thanks Alan! Great advice as usual. I considered bringing it to my LBS and asking them if I could watch / learn.. Ultimately, I would like to learn to do it myself so when I get a flat, I will be prepared. We’ve moving tomorrow, but I hope to get it squared away this week…I will keep you posted.

    Thanks!

    Greg

 
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