Gallery: Alan’s Civia Bryant Belt Alfine

Alan's Civia Bryant
Alan's Civia Bryant
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Alan's Civia Bryant
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Alan's Civia Bryant
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Alan's Civia Bryant
Alan's Civia Bryant
Alan's Civia Bryant
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Alan's Civia Bryant
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Alan's Civia Bryant
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Alan's Civia Bryant
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[Mel's beautiful photos of his Rivendell AHH inspired me to take advantage of this evening's gorgeous light and take some shots of my new bike for the Gallery. —Alan]

Specifications

  • Model: 2010 Civia Bryant Belt Alfine
  • Frame/Fork: 58cm Chromoly
  • Cranks: Civia Forged
  • Front Pulley: Gates 50T
  • Rear Pulley: Gates 24T
  • Belt: Gates Carbon Drive 118T
  • Internal Gear Hub: Shimano Alfine 8
  • Brakes: Avid BB5 Road
  • Shift/Brake Levers: Versa VRS-8
  • Headset: FSA Orbit
  • Seatpost: Civia
  • Handlebar: Civia
  • Stem: Civia 100mm
  • Saddle: Selle An-Atomica Titanico
  • Pedals: MKS Touring Light
  • Rims: Alex DH19 Disc
  • Tires: Michelin City 700×32
  • Front Rack: Pass & Stow
  • Rear Rack: Tubus Logo
  • Fenders: Civia Market, Pewter
  • Headlights: Fenix L2D
  • Tail Light: Planet Bike Superflash Stealth
  • Kickstand: Pletscher Double

41 Responses to “Gallery: Alan’s Civia Bryant Belt Alfine”

  • jim Lynch says:

    Sweet ride, Alan.

  • kanishka azimi (new england!) says:

    who is this alan guy?? (:

  • Mel Hughes says:

    Thanks for the compliment, Alan. But I learned from looking at your photos. These shots of your Civia Bryant are proof positive! It is a lovely bike indeed. That Pass & Stow rack really makes the front end look like a workhorse! It looks like a great build.

  • joe says:

    Alan, so how do you get your bike so clean for the photo sessions? Or do you just keep them that way?

  • Alistair Williamson says:

    Thanks Alan,

    I really appreciate your choice to get the civia, so we can collectively enjoy what you learn and what refinements you make. The pictures really share (and propegate) your love of form and detail.

    On both those topics I noticed the cabling as it enters the rear brake has quite a sharp bend, then a small second bend. I suspect that is to allow enought slack to move the brakes back if needed, but with a belt that’s not so likely. I’d love to learn sometime (if you were so moved) the effort to shorten that cable housing to smooth out the bend, and if there was a discernable improvement in brake feel afterwards.

    Cheers, Alistair

  • David Vo says:

    I am curious what you have the Paul Gino mount connected to on the Pass & Stow front rack. Was it a custom bracket or is there a screw slot on each side? I could understand the slot being there on forks for a rack mount but why are there holes on the Pass & Stow rack? Not a complaint, just confused.

  • Alan says:

    Thanks, Mel!

  • Alan says:

    @joe

    “Alan, so how do you get your bike so clean for the photo sessions? Or do you just keep them that way?”

    That may be the #1 question I get asked.. :-) I keep them pretty clean as a regular thing. I wash them fairly often, and it doesn’t hurt to live in an area with a very mild climate most of the year. I do occasionally prep a bike for a photo session, but typically only when it’s specifically for a review.

    Alan

  • Alan says:

    @Alistair

    Thank you!

    I followed your suggestion and clipped 1/2″ or so off of the rear brake housing this afternoon. The path of the housing looks better, but I’m surprised that I can’t really feel any difference in the brake action.

    Regards,
    Alan

  • Jeff says:

    Alan,

    Your Civia looks so beautiful and dialed in. Your Sam has always been one of my favorites, however the new Civia is simply awesome. Enjoy the great weekend weather we are having in our region as we kick off National Bike Month.

    Best,
    Jeff

  • Alan says:

    @David

    The light mounts on the Pass & Stow are actually a part of the rack. They’re offered as an option when you purchase the rack (the brackets bolt on, so they can also be retrofitted at a later date if they’re not initially ordered with the rack). There’s a 5mm threaded braze-ons on each side to accept the mounts. It’s a slick set-up..

    Alan

  • Alan says:

    Thanks, Jeff. You too! It looks like we broke 80 degrees today! :-)

  • Alistair Williamson says:

    @ Alan
    “I followed your suggestion and clipped 1/2″ or so off of the rear brake housing this afternoon… I can’t really feel any difference in the brake action.”

    Wow, that was snappy. Much appreciated. I’m looking at Avid BB7 disks on the chainstay (like the civia) for a bike I’m putting together and was wondering about cable routing. Seems I don’t need to be too paranoid.

    Cheers, Alistair

  • Alan says:

    @Alistair

    “Wow, that was snappy.”

    You caught me on a good day. I was doing a little maintenance this afternoon anyway, so it only took a few minutes. Thanks for reminding me… :-)

    I think you’ll really like the BB7s (I had them on a couple of different recumbents). I’m actually pretty happy with the BB5s, but if I didn’t ride such robust, flat-resistant tires, I might consider an upgrade to the BB7s for their ease of adjustment.

    Regards,
    Alan

  • Bryce Knudson says:

    Alan,

    What are those brackets that help your fender rod avoid the disc brake on the front end? Did it come with the fender? or a separately purchased piece?

    Thanks,

    Bryce

  • Etienne says:

    Wow that’s nice.

  • Beth says:

    Hi Alan,

    Love the bike!

    How do you like the MKS Touring Light pedals? I don’t like the pedals that came with my new Trek, and I don’t like nor want clipless pedals. Also, do you know the size of the pedal? I have big feet.

  • Alan says:

    @Bryce

    That bracket comes with Axiom disc fenders. Unfortunately Axiom is not selling the part separately at this point, but it sounds as if they may do so in the future.

    Alan

  • Alan says:

    Hi Beth,

    I like these and the standard MKS touring pedal. They’re not for everyone – some people find the platform too small. I prefer a small platform that allows me to feel the edges of the pedal as opposed to a large platform like the Grip Kings or other similar BMX-type pedals. This is definitely one of those personal choices not unlike saddle preferences…

    Alan

  • John Ferguson says:

    Thanks for all the detail pics for us wannabe Bryant owners – it makes the build and setup much clearer. Civia should pay you (oh wait..)! I was going to comment on the rear brake housing by the caliper but Alistair beat me to it..

    I do have one question – looks like you’ve got a Shimano disk up front and an Avid disk on the rear wheel. Did your bike come like that or was there a need to swap out the front disk? I’m sure it works fine, I’m just wondering why the two different rotors.

  • John Ferguson says:

    Maybe just one more: Have you weighed your steed in it’s current configuration? Weight weenies want to know, especially because it’s my size.. :)

  • Alan says:

    Hi John,

    The rotors are both Shimano and were delivered this way on the bike from the factory. I’m not sure why they’re different (I’ll see if I can figure it out and let you know).

    I’ll weigh the bike tonight and let you know.

    Alan

  • Bob Rokop says:

    Alan,

    What are you going to do with the time you save by not having to regularly wax your chain?

  • Alan says:

    @Bob

    No worries, I still have the rest of the family’s stable to maintain. The crockpot’s not going back to the thrift store quite yet… :-)

  • Rich says:

    Love the two galleries. I wish I could mash those two bikes together: give me the lugged, old school stylings of the Riv with the modern drivetrain of the Civia. I guess the question is, does anyone make a lugged steel frame that can accommodate a belt drive/IGH?

    I actually test rode the Civia Kingfield this weekend and was very impressed. No disc brakes, Nexus instead of Alfine and a bar-end instead of a brifter, but it comes with fenders and a rack and costs $400 less than the Bryant. Also, the paint job is a little more old school and to my liking. Made it hard to get back on the World Sport for the ride home!

  • Eric says:

    I guess I’m too new to EcoVelo to know all the lingo; what is “wax your chain” code for? If it’s too inappropriate for the site, I understand.

  • Alan says:

    @John

    The front rotor is a 160mm Shimano RT51 to fit the 6-bolt front hub, the rear rotor is a 160mm Shimano RT53 to fit the Center Lock rear hub.

    Without lights, but outfitted as shown above with racks, double-leg kickstand, etc. the bike weighs 35 lbs. on my scale.

    Alan

  • Alan says:

    @Eric

    “I guess I’m too new to EcoVelo to know all the lingo; what is “wax your chain” code for? If it’s too inappropriate for the site, I understand.”

    http://www.ecovelo.info/2010/05/30/chain-maintenance-for-clean-freaks/
    http://www.ecovelo.info/2011/01/08/for-the-non-believers-in-the-crowd-chain-waxing-re-visited/

    :-)

  • Alan says:

    @Rich

    “I guess the question is, does anyone make a lugged steel frame that can accommodate a belt drive/IGH?”

    I haven’t seen one but I’m sure a competent builder could do it. My guess is that the break would need to be in the seat stay.

    Alan

  • Tom Stahl says:

    Alan,

    Will you please keep us posted on the long-term durability of the belt drive? Riding home last night in the rain, listening to road sand (still left over from the last snow) ping off my fenders and bottom bracket ocassionally, I began to think about how much wear all that grit causes the drivetrain of my Long Haul Trucker. I think my next commuter will be belt drive for sure.

    Great pics…as always!

  • Alan says:

    @Tom

    Will do. Just as a point of reference, Gates is claiming approximately twice the life of a chain. Probably the greatest benefit in gritty conditions is that the only maintenance required of the belt is a quick rinse with the hose.

    Alan

  • David Vo says:

    Alan,

    Can you please tell me what your stem angle is, how many spacers are under your stem (you can give total mm), and how tall your handlebars are in relation to your seat? I know you promote a level setup or even bars higher than seat but from the pictures the seat looks a bit higher?

  • Alan says:

    David,

    Stem: 7 degree
    Stack: 50mm

    The tops of the bars are 2-3mm above the tip of the saddle, and around 1cm above the lowest/widest point of the saddle. They appear lower than the saddle in the photos because the double-legged kickstand lifts the back of the bike 3.5″.

    Alan

  • JP Atkinson says:

    Alan:

    I have ordered a Bryant 58cm frame and I am pulling together parts for my commuter build. I can’t seem to find information on the maximum width tire for this frame. What do you think it might be? Also, if you could spec them for yourself, what wheel/brake combination would you recommend for the Bryant? Your site and this post, in particular, pushed me to move on this bike! I am going with the Alfine 11 for the rear hub, contemplating a dynamo hub in front.

    - Joe

  • Alan says:

    @JP

    Hi Joe,

    I haven’t tried a tire this wide yet, but it looks as if you could easily mount a 37mm Marathon Supreme on the Bryant. One thing to consider is the issue of getting the rear wheel out of the rear-facing horizontal dropouts with a large tire and a fender mounted. I can (just barely) remove my rear wheel with the Civia fender and 32mm Michelin City tires, but a tighter running fender or a tire with a taller profile might keep the wheel from sliding out of the dropout. If you’re not running fenders it’s not an issue.

    If I was building the bike from scratch, I’d opt for the Alfine 11 like you. I’d probably go with the 36h hub. I’m curious about the Velocity VXC disc-specific rim. I’d ask my builder about that rim as an alternative to the standard Dyad or Synergy. I think it would look great paired with the black Alfine hub. Another option might be the Mavic A317.

    For brakes I’d go with the Avid BB7. The stock bike comes spec’d with the BB5 which is a fine brake, but the BB7 is a little more powerful and easier to set-up. The difference is not necessarily worth the expense of making the swap on a factory build, but it’s certainly worth the extra expense if you’re building from scratch anyway.

    Good luck with your build! I’m sure you’re going to love the bike. Please let me know how it turns out; I’d love to see some pics of the completed project.

    Regards,
    Alan

  • sygyzy says:

    Alan,

    I was looking at the Civia video on how to remove the rear wheel on a bike with IGH/Belt Drive and noticed it’s not at all difficult. However, compared to my Civia bike, I noticed a large discrepancy. In the video, the bike has about 2-3 inches of slack past the little nut that attaches the cable to the IGH mechanism. The end is crimped. This gives the rider something to grab on to to pull the cable out and release the tension.

    However, on my bike, the cable is cut right at the nut and the ends are left frayed (no crimp). I went to look at your photos and you have the exact same situation. Do you think this is a bad build on the part of the LBS or did it come from the factory that way?

    http://www.ecovelo.info/images/gallery-bryant-10-1000.jpg

    How do you plan on removing your wheel, when the time comes, with no easy way of gripping the nut? Are you going to carry a pair of needlenose pliers and try to grip that 1mm nub of frayed cable? I don’t really feel comfortable trying to reach in there to pull out a nut under tension.

  • Alan says:

    @sygyzy

    No sweat on the flush cut cable – I actually prefer it this way. Here’s the procedure for disconnecting the cable from the hub:

    1. Shift to 1st gear – this releases most of the tension off of the cable.

    2. Pull the STI-style tension adjuster forward and remove it along with the shifter cable from the stop at the base of the head tube. There’s no need to twist the adjuster – just pull it straight forward and slide out the cable. (see photo) This completely releases tension on the cable and gives you a good 6-8″ of slack.

    3. Now with that slack cable, the connecting nut at the rear hub can be slipped right out with zero effort and no tools. To re-install, just reverse the process. If you’re careful not to twist the adjuster, you won’t need to reset your cable tension.

    Couldn’t be easier! :-)

    PS – If your Kingfield doesn’t have the STI adjuster (can’t recall now how they come from the factory), you can do the same thing at the downtube cable stop – just remove the housing and cable from that stop to release the tension on the cable.

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