Gallery: Brandon’s Surly Bill Trailer

Brandon's Surly Trailer
Zoom
Brandon's Surly Trailer
Zoom

Brandon submitted photos of his Civia Bryant for our Gallery last week. In his note, he mentioned that he sold his car and that he’d be pulling a Surly trailer behind his bike for general utility and even for transporting his mountain bike to the races. These photos are the follow-up. Very cool!

12 Responses to “Gallery: Brandon’s Surly Bill Trailer”

  • adam allstar says:

    That is awesome! I haven’t seen one of those trailers in use. Looks like you could set it up to haul most things you could fit inside a small car, love the setup with the bike racks.

  • John Ferguson says:

    That’s awesome.. I hope there’s beer in that there plastic bucket!

  • Don says:

    If his town is as flat as his neighborhood, he’s in good shape to put all kinds of stuff on that. Parade float?

  • voyage says:

    Here’s the link to Surly’s Trailer:

    http://surlybikes.com/frames/surly_trailer/

    Actually, we used another company’s trailer and a beater bike about five years ago when restoring an old house:

    http://www.bikesatwork.com/

    Then we bought an old beater pick up truck.

    We still have the trailer.

  • Brandon says:

    @John Ferguson

    There’s enough space for a small cooler as well. Trust me, what good is a bike race without the necessary recovery brews?

    @ Don

    Flat. Super flat, until you get beyond the town limits. Nothing that I won’t be able to handle. But now you can see why I opted for the Tiagra build. And depending on how truly tough it is to haul what I plan to haul, I might go to a 3 ring crank.

  • Pete says:

    Serious trailer! Looks awesome with the Bryant. Kind of like when I see a Mercedes G-Wagen pulling a really slick car trailer!

    But 37 lbs? That’s quite a load before you’ve even added the… um… load. I guess maybe if you’re hauling construction materials you would need something like this.
    For the mountain bike races, you could put slicks on and just ride the MTB to the race with your knobbies and cooler in a lightweight aluminum trailer…

    I really like the old single-wheel Goeland/Jack Taylor trailers, the Bob, and the Burly Travoy, which all run around 15lbs or so, but obviously not for hauling cement blocks or other bikes!

  • Brandon says:

    Pete,
    True on all counts. It is heavy as far as trailers go. But considering what I’m going to use it for, it’s worth it to me. I got rid of my Isuzu Trooper, but still wanted the capability of hauling crap to the dump, buying loads of lumber, going to the nursery for trees, shrubs, dirt, etc.
    I have considered the MTB slicks thing as well. But It’d be a pain considering that I’m going tubeless. If you take into account the extra wheelset, the tent (overnighters for early races), the camping gear, race gear, and food, I’d need some sort of hauling device. And since I also want to haul the earlier items and errands, a lightweight one wouldn’t handle both. I don’t need two trailers (according to the wife!) so I opted for one that can do anything, not even considering the weight. And hey, what better strength training for racing?

  • sherrill says:

    Now this is what I’m talking about! I have been thinking about how I can get my groceries back home on my bike. Hmmm.

  • Micheal Blue says:

    Very nice. Hey, the ultimate coup would be loading a car on the trailer (Smart, Mini) and pulling it.

  • John L. says:

    Brandon, your Surly trailer is definitely the hardcore setup. Looking good. I bought a Croozer cargo trailer about a month ago, and I love it for hauling groceries and other supplies.

  • somervillebikes says:

    Brandon, I love your Burley trailer setup and would love to be able to use one of these for lumber runs! How’s the drag when empty? Does the hitch by itself add a lot of weight to the bike?

  • Brandon says:

    @somervillebikes

    When I hauled the trailer home after building it at the office, it was complately empty, and I constantly looked back to make sure it was still hanging on! It tracked perfectly, and didn’t disrupt the handling of the bike one bit. It was quiet, solid, and I could only tell that I was pulling a trailer when I had to start from a stoplight.
    I’ve put a load of plywood and a crate of straps (estimated at 60 lbs) on it and I could then tell that the trailer was there, but it only felt like I was in a headwind. Just more weight to pull. Still didn’t disrupt handling, and still tracked perfectly. I’m sure as the weight goes up, so will the hauling sensation, but only in that I’ll have to use lower gears and go slower and brake sooner. The hitch design is pure genius on this trailer, and I’m confident that no matter the load, the bike will still corner, turn, and lean just like it would have with nothing on it.

 
© 2011 EcoVelo™