Stuff We Like: Wald 137 Basket

LHT with Leaf

We have a fondness for Wald baskets.

Wald has been making wire bicycle baskets in Maysville, Kentucky, USA since 1929. Theirs are undoubtedly the best wire bicycle baskets available. Wald baskets are constructed from steel and nicely finished with no burrs or edges to catch on bags or clothing. The 137 basket is our particular favorite. It’s a small/medium-sized basket, perfect for carrying a single bag of groceries, a small commuter bag, a laptop bag, or a camera bag. The 137 normally comes from the factory with struts, but we prefer to mount it on a randonneur or porteur rack. It can easily be attached to almost any front or rear rack using either small hose clamps or zip ties.

LHT with Wald

The 137 measures 15 x 10 x 4.75 inches and weighs practically nothing. It’s just a perfect little basket; not too big, not too small. Highly recommended.

PS – If you get one, be sure to pick up an elastic cargo net to go along with it.

LHT with Wald

Disclaimer: Yes, Wald a sponsor, but we were fans long before we were fortunate enough to have them come onboard.

Wald

20 Responses to “Stuff We Like: Wald 137 Basket”

  • bostonretrowheelmen says:

    i like walds myself, despite their quirkiness and tendency to rust after awhile. i also agree with ditching the provided attachment hardware, and mounting directly on a rack for a more stable platform with a lower center of gravity (and it simply looks better).

    however, i don’t recommend zip ties. most zip ties will fail over time, as they become brittle with exposure to light. i do like the idea of small diameter metal P-clamps, and for the more patient of bike DIYers, i offer this method of wald basket attachment:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/7516215@N03/4946737973/in/set-72157622917767904/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/7516215@N03/4946752953/in/set-72157622917767904/

    basically, you use stainless steel picture-hanging wire to secure the basket to the rack. it is more time-consuming than P-clamps, but the basket is more stable because it is held to the rack at many more points, and the combined tensile strength of all the wire loops (several hundred on my rack) is probably greater than the basket itself. plus, the wire will never rust or corrode, nor loosen. the downside is that if i ever decide to remove the rack, it’s going to take me more than a few minutes to undo all that wiring!

  • Geir Anders says:

    I have the Wald 137 on my Civia Hyland (mounted to a Racktime Topit) and I’m simply amazed by how useful a bike basket really can be: At first I thought it looked rather small, but the 137 sure takes a lot of stuff: A full grocery bag on my way home, a football and two big water bottles when riding with my son to soccer training, extra clothes on a longer ride, my Timbuk2 courier bag if it’s really hot outside and I want nothing on my back, enough firewood logs for a nice dinner in the woods, you name it. It’s a gem, and I’m gonna get one for my girlfriend as well.

    Attaching it to the rack, however, wasn’t that easy. Mounting it directly with lots of zip-ties made it rattle against the rack tubes on uneven road surfaces – leading me to wrap the upper rack tubes with an old inner tube. Now it’s silent, even if it looks a bit messy (doesn’t bother me too much, it’s a utility tool, after all).

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/geiranders/sets/72157624424657498/with/5134857957/
    (The rack sits high to allow a centre mounted light enough space between the rack and the fender. It annoyed me a bit when I got it, because I would prefer the weight as low as possible, but this is mostly academic: In daily use I don’t even think about this at all – it’s a looking-at-the-bike problem, not a riding-the-bike problem)

    The stainless steel wire solution suggested above is interesting, and will be considered if/when the zip-ties fail! Maybe the way stronger hold would also avoid any rattling?

  • Phil N says:

    As usual, flawless bikes in flawless photos – well done. :)

    Have I missed a previous post describing the flash-light mounting hardware in the images?

  • Adam says:

    I really like walds. My last one saved me from injury when a construction sign fell over across the bike lane in high winds. the steel support wasn’t visible and I probably would have been clotheslined but the Wald basket absorbed the impact and transferred it to my handlebar.

    My biggest gripe w/ baskets is that things fall through them if you get careless (like me). I think its a lot better to have a bag to put in it for most times.

    Are p clamps the same thing as hose clamps? That’s what I prefer to use.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hose_clamp.

  • bongobike says:

    I’ve been using a plastic milk crate on my front rack, but I’m going to get a Wald wire basket. The crate is heavy and ugly as hell. Nothing beats a wire basket.

  • Alan says:

    @Phil N

    Thanks, Phil. The headlight mounts are an integral part of the Pass & Stow cargo rack. The flashlights themselves are held to the mounts using TwoFish blocks. It’s a great set-up.

    Regards,
    Alan

  • bostonretrowheelmen says:

    sorry, all. the link above is the wrong one. this is the picture of the stainless steel wire used to secure the wald basket:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/7516215@N03/4946739873/in/set-72157622917767904/

    i should also add, that to prevent any rattles (or scratches to the chrome-plated nitto M12 rack to which the wald is attached), i bought a couple of feet of clear PVC hose (from the hardware store where i got the picture hanging wire– cost me less than $1.00). i made a slit along the entire length of tubing, cut small lengths of it and wrapped the nitto rack’s tubing in it, much in the way you wrap hot wire pipes in your house with foam insulation. the tubing serves to provide a compressive and protective surface between the rack and the wald, so there’s no shifting, squeaking, or rattling. it’s in the pic above, but you can barely even see it!

  • Jamesj says:

    I used to use one of those baskets on my raleigh i loved it i would cram it with my work clothes and water bottle and sometimes lunch…

  • Jeff says:

    I used a similar method (the ss wire) of attaching my Wald 137 to my rear rack but I used hemp twine and then shellaced it. It was a labor of love but I was pleased with the outcome. I also had a rust problem where I removed the mounting hardware so I powder coated the basket silver before mounting it.

  • Will says:

    For mounting headlights to Wald Baskets, I wonder if anyone has tried the Minoura LH-100 “Down Grip”, http://www.minourausa.com/english/accessory-e/lh100-e.html .

    I also like the 137 and a little shameless self-promotion: http://www.ecovelo.info/2010/10/09/will-millhisers-photo-contest-entry :-)

  • 2whls3spds says:

    Wald baskets are a part of Americana and they are a great value for the dollar. My current basket bike has them front and rear.

    Note to bostonretrowheelman…there are a several grades of zip ties. The white ones are typically NOT UV resistant, many of the black ones are.

    Aaron

  • Brent says:

    I had one of these on my bike, but I replaced it with a Gamoh King Carrier. I still use it though, I put a pillow in it, and my dog naps in it – it is the perfect size for him. He loves it!

  • andy says:

    I’m surprised that no one has mentioned anything about the beautiful handmade (in San Francisco) Pass & Stow rack that the Wald basket is perched on top of. Yes, those inexpensive baskets are lovely, but the struts they come with are weak and the mounting hardware limits the size of bike they can go on and the placement of the basket above the wheel. This photo cannot be appreciated fully without acknowledging the Pass and Stow.

  • Alan says:

    @andy

    You’re absolutely correct, Andy; the Wald is the icing on the Pass & Stow cake!

    Regards,
    Alan

  • somervillebikes says:

    i’m sure the pass&stow is a nice, sturdy rack, but the problems with the pass&Stow as i see them are that a) it is only offered in black, and b) it appears to have only one set of fork eyelet attachment points, so the rack would sit unnecessarily high on a bike with, say, 26″ or 650B wheels.

    by comparison, velo orange offers their porteur rack which appears about the same in terms of basic size and functionality, yet pre-drilled for three different wheel sizes, at only slightly more than half the price of the pass&stow.

    have you considered doing a comparison test of the two?

  • Alan says:

    @somervillebikes

    “have you considered doing a comparison test of the two?”

    Yes, I’d love to do that. Thanks for the nudge… :-)

    Alan

    PS – Just for the record, the P&S is also available in silver – my friend has one on his AHH and it’s quite lovely…

  • somervillebikes says:

    alan, not according to their website. andy’s post prompted me to check out their website, where they state that you can get them in any color…so long as it’s black!!! (hardy har har… ). that’s good to know they come in silver as well.

  • Alan says:

    @somervillebikes

    “andy’s post prompted me to check out their website, where they state that you can get them in any color…so long as it’s black!!!”

    Yeah, I had forgotten about that. Matt F. is Pass & Stow, and he’s just a cool guy brazing up racks in a small shop while he goes to school. If a person was to give him a call, I’m pretty sure he’d have a rack coated for them in just about any color as long as they don’t mind the wait.

  • Pass&Stow says:

    As the maker of the rack noted above, I wanted to chime in and pass along some info regarding my racks.
    I make the racks in black and silver and try and work with costumers that have custom color needs.
    I make three size legs, one for 26/650b/700×25, another for 700×25-35 with fenders, and when needed a long-leg for balloon tires.
    Hope this helps
    Matt

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