Phil’s Brommie Hub (and a New Website)

Phil Brommie Hub

Phil Wood & Co., makers of some of the best hubs and bottom brackets on the planet, recently updated their website. It’s looks super. Some interesting products I noticed while perusing the site include the Brompton front hub shown above, and a line of belt-drive-specific components. Yowza.

Phil Wood & Co.

Don’t Lose Your Transit Benefit

Waiting for the Train

If you’re a multi-modal commuter, your transit benefit is about to be cut in half unless you act now. The law that brought the monthly transit payroll deduction in line with the pre-existing $230 parking deduction, is due to expire in January. From Transportation for America:

Come January, if you spend more than $120 a month on your commute in a vanpool, train or bus, the federal government will be sending a message loud and clear: they’d like you to start driving to work, where you can get $230 for parking deducted from your paycheck tax free.

A provision in the stimulus bill increased the transit benefit from $120 to $230, finally putting it on equal footing with the $230 parking benefit and extending this great benefit to everyone, whether they drive or take transit each day. But that provision is about to expire unless Congress votes to extend it during their December session.

Take action at the following sites.

Tri-State Transportation Campaign
Commuter Nation

Trees By Bike

Trees by Bike

Trees By Bike sells locally-grown Christmas trees and delivers them by bike to neighborhoods around Portland, OR. Here’s how it works:

TreesByBike.com is a small collective of Portland folks who are looking to spread some holiday cheer, make a little extra money, and raise some cash for things we care about. All of our trees are locally grown and 10% of your order total is donated to specific charities, foundations, and groups depending on who delivers your tree. We let our Riders of Yule decide where the money they work for goes. To find the charity, foundation, or organizations that each rider donates to, please check the “Riders” page.

What a cool way to spread Holiday cheer!

Trees By Bike

Ah, What a Problem to Have

Yahoo! News

It could only happen in Copenhagen (well, perhaps Amsterdam, too). In an article on Yahoo! News, Danish Cyclist Federation spokesman Frits Bredal was quoted as saying, “Copenhagen’s roads are overloaded with people who want to ride their bicycles in all kinds of weather.” According to the article, the Noerrebrogade thoroughfare is the busiest bicycle street in Europe, used by approximately 36,000 bicyclists a day. Noerrebrogade’s bike paths are filled to the brim with bicycles (ah, what a problem to have). To solve the issue, the paths will be widened by over 12 feet and the main roadway will be reserved for buses only. Incredible.

Read the article at Yahoo! News

Triangles

Triangles
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The Brompton Folding Bicycle

Brompton M3L
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[Having owned three now, this article should be read with the presumption that I'm a big fan of Brompton folding bicycles. In other words, consider it more of a general overview of Bromptons written by a devotee, rather than an unbiased, technical road test of a specific model. —ed.]

The Benefits of Folding Bicycles

Folding bicycles offer many advantages to commuters, tourists, and anyone who needs a bike for transportation, but has limited space for storage.

In many cases, bike racks on buses and trains are available only on a first-come, first-served basis. This leaves owners of full-sized bikes vulnerable to being bumped off of transit in the event a rack is full. Folding bikes solve this issue by being allowed inside many buses and trains. When hidden by a slip cover, a tiny folded bike like the Brompton is no bigger than a small suitcase, and even if regulations state otherwise, they can often be brought on-board and stored in a luggage area.

Brompton M3L
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Small folding bikes are often exempt from building regulations that bar regular bikes from entering. In addition, they open up a variety of storage possibilities at the workplace, while also eliminating the security issues associated with storing bikes outside. A folded Brompton is small enough to fit under a desk in even a tiny cubicle.

Brompton M3L
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Multi-modal touring is an appealing option for those who either have physical limitations or time constraints. With a small folding bike, a person can cover a portion of their tour by train, plane, or bus, then use their folding bike for exploration at various destinations along the way. We’re very interested in the idea of taking a train across the country with our pair of Bromptons, stopping along the way to explore the sights in various locations.

Brompton M3L
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If limited storage space at home is an issue, folding bikes are a great way to make the best use of the space that is available. Compact folding bikes like the Brompton are small enough to be stored under a desk or even inside a cupboard. And for those who are sensitive about the visual effect of having a bicycle stored in their living space, a small folder with a slip cover makes an unobtrusive package that disappears into a corner or cubbyhole.

Brompton Company Background

The story of Brompton is the quintessential tale of the inventor/entrepreneur who had a vision, brought it to reality through a long process of experimentation and prototyping, and eventually brought a mature product to market in a very successful way.

Brompton’s owner, designer, and current Technical Director, Andrew Ritchie, first had the idea of developing a better folding bike in 1975 after seeing a Bickerton. From that initial spark, it took 13 years of prototyping and fund raising to reach the point of full production in 1988. The Brompton as we know it has been in continuous production since then. Throughout, the company has remained under private ownership, and production has remained in-house in West London, UK.

Today, Brompton has a cult following unlike practically any other bike brand — folding or otherwise. Brompton clubs exist all over the world, and numerous online communities have sprouted up around the brand. The so-called “Brompton World Championship” — a somewhat tongue-in-cheek annual race with entrants dressing in business attire and riding Bromptons — has become wildly popular, with 750 participants this year.

The Brompton Fold

Any discussion about a Brompton starts and stops with the fold, which is arguably the best among all folding bikes. The parallel, three-part fold places the wheels side-by-side, with all of the vulnerable parts protected between the wheels. The overall folded dimensions are 22.2” x 21.5” x 10.6”. That’s a small package for any folder, particularly for one that rides so well. But, even more important is the clean outline of the folded package. The size and shape are not unlike a small suitcase, with the nose of the saddle cleverly serving as a carry handle. With a slip cover over the top, the folded Brompton is so compact and smooth that it can be carried into almost any venue without raising an eyebrow — most people won’t even realize it’s a bike.

The Brompton fold is a three-step process, as follows:

  1. Start by flipping the quick release located under the seat clamp and lifting the back of the bike to swing the rear wheel forward under the frame. Cleverly, in this position the bike is designed to stand on its own. Brompton owners often use this partially folded position to “park” their bikes.
  2. Next, release the hinge on the main frame and swing the frame back on itself, locking it into position.
  3. Finally, release the hinge at the base of the stem/riser, fold the bars, and lower the saddle. The bars snap into place, and the seatpost locks the entire package for carrying.

The entire process takes 10-20 seconds and becomes second nature in a very short time.

Brompton M3L
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Cleverly, the Brompton has a pair of tiny wheels strategically placed at the top of the rear triangle for turning the bike into a rolling cart. When the rear triangle is folded underneath, the small wheels swing around to face the ground. With the handlebars unfolded, the bike can be rolled along on these wheels, much like an airline luggage cart.

The Ride

Bromptons are unusually quick and compact, though not at all unstable or uncomfortable. The 16” (349mm) wheels and compact frame make for a light and nimble feel. The steering is razor sharp, with small inputs at the handlebars being immediately transmitted to the road. It takes a brief time to adapt to the quick handling, but once the rider is acclimated, the Brompton becomes a formidable tool for zipping and weaving through dense, urban traffic.

Brompton M3L
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Small wheels tend to provide a harsh ride. Brompton mitigates for this with a suspension block located where the main frame and rear triangle meet. The travel at the rear wheel is short and, unlike the long travel suspension on mountain bikes, is only intended to take the edge off of small obstacles. This small amount of rear wheel travel does a remarkable job of smoothing out imperfections in the road while helping the bike track straight over rough surfaces. The use of relatively high flotation tires run at reasonable pressures (I run Schwalbe Marathons on my M3L at 60psi) also does much to smooth out what might otherwise be a fairly harsh ride.

Brompton M3L
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Brompton M3L
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Brompton M3L
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Bromptons are only available in one size and three handlebar styles, none of which can be adjusted for height. This results in a bike that will feel and fit differently depending upon a person’s physical stature. A Brompton will feel much like a “full-sized” bike to a small person who is accustomed to riding small frames. On the other hand, a Brompton may feel on the small side to a larger person (say, over 6’0”) who is accustomed to riding large frames. This is not necessarily an issue, and many people of all statures, including those well over 6’ tall, adapt to riding Bromptons successfully.

Folding bikes in general have a reputation for being only good for short rides in the city, but Bromptons have been widely used for long-distance touring. In fact, there are a number of people who have taken transcontinental trips on Bromptons, and I know of at least one couple who made a ‘round-the-world trip combining boat and train travel with their Bromptons. Just recently, Todd Fahrner, owner of Clever Cycles in Portland, took an unsupported tour down the California coast (from Portland to San Francisco) on his Brompton.

The Build

Bromptons are built like tanks. That doesn’t mean they’re unusually heavy; they’re not. But where it matters — namely the frame and hinges — they’re clearly designed to withstand many years of hard use. The main frame is built from brazed (not welded), high tensile steel. The over-sized main tube is stiff, and there’s no sign of flex that comes from either the frame or the hinges. The handlebar stem/riser — a weak area among many folders — is surprisingly stiff. The frame is on the verge of being overbuilt, but folders other than Bromptons are notorious for coming apart after a few years, so I feel the robust design is a fair trade for a small amount of added weight.

Brompton M3L
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Brompton M3L
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Brompton M3L
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My M3L’s Sturmey Archer 3-speed internal gear hub performs quite well and compares favorably to modern hubs from Shimano and SRAM. Shifts are crisp and can be initiated while pedaling, coasting, or standing still. I really like the Brompton proprietary thumb shifter too; it’s easy to use and it stays in adjustment. The 3-speed is arguably the best among S-A’s offerings. The 5-speed S-A on my Pashley was clunky in comparison; it needed frequent adjustment and missed shifts were not uncommon. I’ve had zero issues with the 3-speed.

Brompton M3L
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Brompton M3L
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The Brompton M- and S-Type cockpits are not particularly ergonomically-friendly. As necessitated by the compact fold, the brake levers are on the short side, and the grips are thin and narrow. Ergons are a big improvement over the stock grips; if you go this route, be sure to check that they don’t interfere with the fold.

I find the new Brompton saddle to be more comfortable than previous incarnations. It also has a hand grip on the underside of the horn for carrying the bike when folded; clever!

I’ve owned three Bromptons and I’ve yet to have any issues with components or wheel builds. The Brompton-branded dual-pivot brakes are snappy and and plenty powerful. The Brompton-branded crank is attractive and plenty stiff. The chain tensioner keeps the chain taut when the bike is folded. The wheels are tough and require only occasional touch-up. The overall component mix is excellent, and the detailing, fit, and finish leave very little room for improvement (other than perhaps the hand grips mentioned above).

Brompton M3L
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Brompton M3L
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Brompton M3L
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Options

You may have noticed that each Brompton model number consists of two letters and a number. The first letter indicates handlebar style (S, M, P), the number indicates the number of gears (1,2,3,6), and the second letter indicates fender and rack packages (E, L, R). So in the case of our M3L test bike, we have a mid-rise handlebar (M), 3-speed drivetrain (3), and fenders (L).

Brompton M3L
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Each Brompton is essentially “made-to-order”, with a wide variety of options available. There are three base models, the S-Type, M-Type, and P-Type. The S-Type is the sporty model with a lower flat bar; the M-Type (as shown here) is the classic Brompton with a mid-rise bar; and, the P-Type is the touring model with a trekking bar that provides multiple hand positions. Any of these models can be upgraded to the “super-light” package (indicated by an “X” after the model number) with a titanium fork, rear triangle, fender stays and pedal bolt; and, an alloy headset and seat post.

All three models are available with either 1, 2, 3, or 6 speed drivetrains. The 1-speed is a standard single speed freewheel; the 2-speed is a proprietary Brompton-made 2-speed derailleur; the 3-speed is a variation on the classic Sturmey Archer 3-speed internal gear hub; and, the 6-speed is the 2-speed derailleur in combination with a wider range 3-speed Sturmey Archer IGH.

Brompton M3L
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Fender and rack options include the Version E, Version L, and Version R. The Version E is the basic model sans fenders and rack; the Version L includes front and rear fenders; and the Version R includes the fenders plus a rear rack.

Various other options include: extended and telescoping seatposts for individuals with >33” inseams; choice of tires; choice of saddle (stock or Brooks B-17); battery or dynamo lighting systems; and, a variety of luggage options, which I’ll cover below.

Luggage

The Brompton Front Carrier Block is a universal mount that accepts any bag in the Brompton line-up. The block is attached to the headtube, which places the weight on the frame, leaving the steering essentially unaffected.

Brompton M3L
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Brompton M3L
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NYCeWheels sent us a full range of Brompton bags to try out, from the simple Folding Basket, all the way up to the A Bag leather briefcase:

  • The Folding Basket is a grocery-style pannier adapted to fit the FCB.
  • The S-Bag is a small messenger-style bag with a 20-liter capacity designed to fit the lower handlebars and shorter stem on the S-Type bike (it also fits the other models). It’s constructed from water-resistant nylon and comes supplied with a waterproof rain cover and shoulder strap. This is a nice bag if you only carry a lunch and a few small items to work.
  • The C-Bag is a full-sized messenger bag with a 25-liter capacity. It’s constructed from water-resistant nylon and comes supplied with a waterproof rain cover and shoulder strap. The C-Bag is a nice size for commuting, with enough room for a change of clothes, lunch, and even a small laptop. With the addition of a little padding, it also serves as a nice camera bag for a small DSLR outfit. This is my favorite bag from Brompton.
  • The T-Bag is Brompton’s touring model. It’s their largest bag with a 31-liter capacity. It has a roll top and numerous pockets and pouches inside and out. It comes supplied with a rain cover. This is a big bag that’s perfect for touring or grocery hauling, but perhaps a little large for commuting.
  • The A-Bag is Brompton’s leather executive briefcase. It’s a beautiful piece of work, but it’s a bit ostentatious (and pricey) for this humble commuter.
  • The B-Bag is a carrying bag for the bike itself. It’s a heavy duty bag with casters, a carry handle, a shoulder strap, and 5mm padding all around. With the use of a pair of B-Bags, we’re able to drop both of our Bromptons in the cargo area of our tiny car without fear of damaging the bikes. A must-have if you plan to transport your Brompton in an automobile or airplane.
  • The Slip Cover is a small cover that slips over the bike from the top. It makes it much easier to sneak the Bromptom into buildings and onto buses and trains without notice. It stores on the seat post when not in use.
Brompton M3L
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Conclusion

When I think of a Brompton bicycle, I think “clever and refined”. From its unique fold, to its suspended rear triangle and “rolling cart” capabilities, this is a bike that’s oozing with intelligent details. The underlying design of the Brompton has changed very little over the years; the bugs and quirks have been almost completely worked out of this bike through a long process of testing and refinement. While there are other interesting folding bikes on the market that offer viable alternatives to the Brompton, in my view there’s yet to be another folder that brings together a clean, compact fold and excellent ride quality in such a compelling way.

Brommie
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M3L Specifications
  • Frame & Fork: Steel
  • Handlebars: M-Type
  • Saddle: Brompton with moulded grip and hollow rails
  • Seatpost: Brompton steel telescopic
  • Pedals: Brompton folding/platform
  • Brakes: Brompton dual-pivot caliper
  • Shifter: Brompton
  • Front Hub: Brompton standard
  • Rear Hub: Sturmey Archer BSR 3-speed internal gear hub
  • Rims: Alloy
  • Tires: Schwalbe Marathon
  • Folded dimensions: 22.2” x 21.5” x 10.6”
  • Weight as shown: 25 lbs.
  • Approximate price as shown: $1,424
Disclosure

The M3L discussed in this article was supplied by our sponsor, NYCeWheels. For more information about our reviews, read our review policy.

NYCeWheels
Brompton

EcoVelo “Why I Ride” Photo Contest Results

The “Why I Ride” Photo Contest was a great success this year. The quality and quantity of the nearly 300 photos and accompanying essays went well beyond our expectations. We found the entries both entertaining and a real source of inspiration to keep riding and sharing our story; we hope they did the same for you. Many thanks to everyone who participated!

Without further ado, here are your winners:

Grand Prize
Mitchell Connell

Runners-up
1st Runner-up — Boban James
2nd Runner-up — Mary Bernsen
3rd Runner-up — Danette Rivera
4th Runner-up — Glenn Budak

Honorable Mentions
Roger Bombardier Jr.
Jake Dean
Will Millhiser
Cecily Walker
Richard Wezensky

Readers’ Choice Award
Mary Bernsen


Our Grand Prize winner, Mitchell Connell, is a bike commuter and student at Hillsboro High School in Nashville, Tennessee. The camaraderie, nostalgia, and longing for the open road expressed in his photo, as well as his story about pragmatism and persistence, spoke powerfully to a number of the judges. Mitchell is the recipient of a Civia Midtown bicycle as well as 5 items of his choosing from the prize pool. Congratulations, Mitchell!

Grand Prize Winner — Mitchell Connell

My twin, Spencer, and I have grown up in a family full of ambition but lacking in commitment. The house that surrounds us is perpetually in a state of incompleteness with floorboards missing and exposed drywall, but through this we have developed both pragmatism and an enamorment for the completion of our goals.

Last summer we rode (with my best friend, Robert Fischman) from our hometown, Nashville, Tennessee to Natchez, Mississippi. After 462 miles and 9 days of leg throbbing persistence we arrived at our most exacting goal yet. This is a photograph of Spencer and Robert less than a mile from the end of the Natchez Trace.

Mitchell Connell


It was a very close contest between the 4 runners-up. In the end, Boban James just edged out Mary Bernsen for second place with his haunting image of monks in a stark Indian landscape. Boban will receive a $400 gift certificate from Rivendell Bicycle Works as well as 5 items of his choosing from our prize pool. For her inspiring photo and poem, Mary will receive a $250 gift certificate from Rivendell as well as 4 items of her choosing from the prize pool.

1st Runner-up — Boban James

Boban James
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This picture was taken in the Himalayan region of Ladakh in India in 2005. We had rented bicycles and were visiting various monasteries near the capital city of Leh. Outside one such monastery, we came across a group of young monks in traditional robes. As soon as they saw our cycles, they thronged around us asking us questions about the bicycle’s mechanics and its speed (“will it go as fast as a car?”). In this picture, one of the more enterprising boys is about to push off for a ride, while his friends await their turn. That’s one of the reasons why I ride- because it’s a joy to be able to share your own love of cycling with others and hopefully that’s what this photo conveys.

Boban James


2nd Runner-up — Mary Bernsen

Mary Bernsen
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Why I ride?

The view is different from the handle bars.
When my legs start moving, clarity of thoughts start flowing.
The busy pace of day-to-day is forgotten.
The senses begin to awaken.

The view is different from the handle bars.
I feel the chill of the morning, the heat of the mid-afternoon sun, and the breeze at night.
I smell the sweet scent of the flowers, the newly mowed grass and the wet pavement.

I hear the insects buzzing, the birds chirping, and the air whispering behind my ears.

The view is different from the handle bars.
Strangers become acquaintances and new friendship emerges.
Scenic locations are discovered and unknown paths are explored.

My soul rejoices as the sense of wonder waits in every turn.
The wind gently strokes my face, and a smile begins to form.

The view is truly different from the handle bars.

Mary Bernsen


Danette Rivera took the 3rd runner-up spot with her fun photo and moving essay. Danette will receive a $100 gift certificate from Rivendell as well as 3 items of her choosing from the prize pool. And rounding out the top group is Glenn Budak with his moody image of a solitary, meditative cyclist. Glenn will receive a $100 gift certificate from NYCeWheels and 2 items of his choosing from the prize pool.

3rd Runner-up — Danette Rivera

Danette Rivera
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When I was eight, I found forty dollars crumpled in the street. I immediately bought a silver spray-painted one speed with a banana seat. It was my prize. When I was ten, I sold colorful soap in a parking lot to make money because I wanted my mom to have a bike too. I thought, She can’t live without a bike. I saved enough for a magnificent metallic red Schwinn with drop handlebars that glowed in the shop window. I couldn’t imagine anyone not dying over this bike, but my mother never rode it; she was puzzled by my enthusiasm. So every month, I tried to reach the pedals of the red beauty until one night I could press them forward, top tube be damned. I rocketed down the street, flushed, screaming in my throat, lightheaded near the curb.
I ride because that’s all I’ve ever wanted to do.

Danette


4th Runner-up — Glenn Budak

One of the reasons I enjoy riding my bicycle is to be in the moment. I love when all the factors are just right and my bicycle disappears beneath me. In this meditative state I see beauty in the smallest things and everything about my world is good and right. My bicycle brings me peace of mind and comfort.

Glenn Budak


The honorable mentions will each receive a prize package put together from the remaining items in the prize pool.

Besides taking 3rd overall, Mary Bernsen also took our hotly contested Readers’ Choice Award. Mary took 15% of the 1371 votes cast, with Danette Rivera coming in second. Mary will receive the Rickshaw Performance Tweed Collection from Rickshaw Bags, and Danette will receive an EcoVelo Houndstooth Wool Cap.

Congratulations to all the winners! We’ll be contacting you shortly about how to collect your prizes. And as always, when the time comes for a purchase, please consider supporting our sponsors; it’s their generous donations that make this possible!

View the Prize List


 
© 2011 EcoVelo™