Arie Dekker’s Photo Contest Entry

Arie Dekker
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Although the expression on my face is somewhat misleading this picture shows why I bike. The satisfaction of getting somewhere so remote and “empty” as the Shetland Islands, just by using my own legs, is enormous. Weather nearly becomes irrelevant; cold, wet and windy circumstances are taken as a fact to live with. The joy of covering large distances under own steam is just beyond anything else.

Arie Dekker
Netherlands

[Entry #126]

12 Responses to “Arie Dekker’s Photo Contest Entry”

  • RDW says:

    Arie, I’m curious about your bicycle, it looks interesting. What is it?

  • Luc says:

    It’s a Pedersen bike
    I dream about that bike too.

  • RDW says:

    Thanks Luc, I thought it looked like the Dursley Pederson pictured in a recent Bicycle Quarterly but couldn’t tell from that angle.

  • Arie Dekker says:

    Luc, you are right it is a Pedersen. I own two of these wonderfull machines. A red one for over 10 years made by Jesper Solling (www.pedersenbicycle.dk) from Denmark which I use as my “Sunday” bike and which has proven a bit too delicate for cycling hollidays which sometimes include unpaved tracks. This black one is custum made by Kemper (www.kemper-velo.de) in Germany for my hollidays. It includes all those items I dreamt of for a long time: good Magura HS33 hydraulic brakes, broad tires, Rohlof gearing and SON dynamo hub and lights. I have made some memorable trips with it of which the Scotland, Orkney, Shetland tour stands out very clear althoug the trip from home in The Netherlands to Geneva in Switzerland also brings back happy memories.

  • Alan says:

    Arie,

    That is an absolutely stunning bike – congratulations. Please consider sending a few photos for our Bicycle Gallery sometime.

    Regards,
    Alan

  • Arie Dekker says:

    Alan, although I dare not compete with your high quality pictures I will try to take some pictures that capture the elegance and superb love and skill with which my bikes are made. The heavy duty black one is getting an overhaul at the moment. I am fixing a porteur rack to it so it can also to be used as regular shopping bike. I have looked a long time for a rack that would suit the special quality of the bike and found it at VeloOrange in your country! Will send pictures in due time since fixing the rack in a way that I can easiliy remove it for holliday periods means rearanging lights and of course, almost everything to be fitted on the bike needs special purpose made parts to attach it.
    Love yor site, it gradually became part of my daily routine to have a look.

    Arie

  • Alan says:

    Thanks, Arie. You sure have good taste in bikes… :-) The heavy duty black one sounds particularly appealing. Can’t wait to see the photos…

    Regards,
    Alan

  • Madness says:

    That bike is AMAZING. I’ve never seen anything like it. Yes, I would love to see up close photos of your custom beauty too please.

  • Kevin says:

    Arie -
    Beautiful photo but, like most everyone else, I’m curious about your Pedersen. What’s the advantage of that design over the more traditional bikes?
    Thanks,
    Kevin

  • Arie Dekker says:

    Kevin, what is the advantage of a Mercedes above an Audi? (to stick to European brands) I do not think this way, it is not about advantages. I fell for the design, the shape. Then I was impressed by the idea that over a century ago Mr. Pedersen designed not only a beatifull bike but also managed to make it a realy light weight one and yet very strong (patented 1893). It is made up from 12 and 15 mm tubes al brazed in triangles, thus making it stiff and strong. Furthermore, the saddle does not rest on a seatpost but is a kind of hammock. Think a century ago when heavy (wrought) iron and uncomfortable wheels (before Mr Dunlop invented air filled tubes that provided a bit of suspension. Seen in this way it was a revolutionary design.
    Becouse the 60 odd connections that have to brazed/welded the bike has never been cheap and with the large scale introduction of Dunlop tires the advantage of suspension ceased. So around the First World Warproduction more or less ended. Total pruduction between 1893 and 1918 is estimated at between 8,00 and 20,00. In 1975Jesper Solling started to make New Pedersen bicycles in Christiania Copenhagen. He stopped a few years ago having made ca. 6,000 frames, including a few tandems!
    Pedersen bikes are ridden in a very upright position which is an advantage for sufferers of back pains, that is the only physical advantage I can think of, apart from riding a special, stunning bike.

    Arie

    P.S. I will send some pictures to Alan as soon as the I finnish the major overhaul

  • Arie Dekker says:

    All,
    A picture showing more of the bike is to be found on this site in last years photo contest, entry date 4 november 2009

    Arie

  • Kevin says:

    Hi Arie.
    I think you answered my question. Your chose a Pedersen because it’s fun, historic, comfortable, and distinctive.
    Well done.
    Kevin

 
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