Hillborne and LHT in Outside Mag

The Rivendell Sam Hillborne and Surly Long Haul Trucker were featured in Outside Magazine.

Hillborne in Outside
LHT in Outside

6 Responses to “Hillborne and LHT in Outside Mag”

  • John says:

    Interesting that the Sam and LHT both scored better than the so-called “editor’s pick” in the versatility and comfort categories but neither was selected for that “honor”. Not priced high enough? Over the years I’ve noticed many times that the Editor’s Picks in Outside seem to be the most expensive, regardless of features/benefits. If it were other features that caused the Hampsten to be selected, then perhaps they shouldn’t have focused so much on the confort and versatility aspects and give a solid reason for their selection.

    The Sam is already my editor’s pick – and I should have it in early June. Can’t wait!

  • Daniel M says:

    I also made the Sam my own pick. I just got word from Rivendell that my frame is in and the build is in progress. Can’t wait.

    My other project is what to do with my Rohloff hub, which is currently on a way-too-twitchy Gary Fisher Hoo Koo e Koo that I’ve had since the late 90′s. I want to turn it into a bombproof rigid-forked all terrain touring + city bike. The Surly LHT with 26″ wheels is one possibility. Another is an original Specialized Stumpjumper from 1983 or so.

    Hope you and Michael are feeling better, Alan.

    Daniel

  • doug in seattle. says:

    @John

    My guess is that, independent of features, the Hampsten is a better ride. More fun to ride. That’s an important characteristic regardless of the stated purpose of the bike. Also, I should point out that the Hampsten scored higher or as high in the “comfort” category as the other two bikes. Of course the Hampsten, as a randonneur bike, is certainly more performance-oriented than the other two frames mentioned, which probably appeals to the performance-oriented editors.

    My porteur-style city bike is a lot more practical than my road bike, but I tend to ride the road bike as much as possible and the city bike (a repurposed ’93 steel MTB) only when necessary. The former is fun to ride, the latter feels like a miserable slog most of the time. Also, I don’t even ride my camping bike anymore unless I’m going camping!

    My solution is to switch everything over to an old touring frame, which should ride a little more energetically while still allowing wide-ish tires and fenders. 98% of the function and durability, but (hopefully) 200% of the fun. I don’t want to groan at the thought of riding my city bike to the other side of the city I live in.

  • John says:

    @Daniel

    When did you place your order? Hopefully, mine will show soon!

    @Doug

    You’re right – the Hampsten does match in the comfort category, and comfort goes a long way towards defining what’s fun to ride (at least at my age!). Personally, I’m much more concerned with the comfort aspect of a bike than performance. Nevertheless when I do get my Sam, I’m hoping for a spirited ride. I’ll leave the racks and fenders on my Surly Crosscheck.

    My observation about Outsite Magazine tending to pick the most expensive item and calling it the Editor’s Pick is simply my opinion from reading the magazine for many years.

    Good riding, all!

    John

  • Daniel M says:

    @John

    I wanted the original style Sam with canti studs so I could run V-brakes, so I ended up paying $250 extra for a Waterford-built frame. The delay due to misaligned labels only affected the Taiwanese frames (which have switched over to sidepulls), so I kinda lucked out.

    Daniel

  • John says:

    @Daniel

    Interesting – I probably would’ve sprung for the extr $250 as well, because I like cantilever brakes and the fact they’re made domestically. I just found out the shipment will be in June because of the decals, but I’m checking to see if any of the others are available in my size.

    Thanks,
    John

 
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