A.N.T. Eye Candy

More sweetness coming out of Mike Flanigan’s workshop. His bikes just keep getting nicer and nicer.

A.N.T.

Under Pressure

A recent document published by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is recommending so called “no-nose” saddles for preventing numbness and SD caused by occupational bicycling. From the document summary:

Workers who ride a bicycle as part of their job may be at risk for genital numbness or more serious sexual and/or reproductive health problems from pressure in the groin (perineum) from the traditional bicycle saddle. NIOSH has conducted studies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of no-nose bicycle saddles in reducing pressure in the groin and improving the sexual health of male bicycle patrol police officers. While most workers in jobs that involve bicycling are men, recent evidence suggests that no-nose bicycle saddles may also benefit women.

The document cites NIOSH studies from 2004 and 2008 that concluded no-nose saddles can reduce pressure on sensitive tissues by at least 65%.

A study by NIOSH [Lowe et al. 2004] showed that saddles without the protruding nose greatly reduced pressure in the groin that compresses the nerves and arteries for the genitals. In a more recent NIOSH study [Schrader et al. 2008], the no-nose saddles were associated with pressure in the groin region of 1.02 pounds per square inch. In a typical pressure picture for a no-nose saddle, there is very little pressure forward of the sit bones (see Figure 4). The pressure on the nerves and arteries for the genitals may be even lower than 1.02 pounds per square inch because some of the measured pressure was caused by the back of the thighs making contact with the rounded-off front of the no-nose saddle. The study showed that the no-nose saddle reduced pressure in the groin by at least 65% (see Figure 5). In the 2008 NIOSH study, more than 90% of officers on bicycle patrol who tried a no-nose saddle were still using the saddle after 6 months. These officers believed that no-nose bicycle saddles could be used safely and effectively in their work. Several of these officers said that it took some time to get used to the no-nose saddle because it has a different feel than a traditional saddle.

It would be nice to know how ergo saddles like the Selle An-Atomica would fare in this comparison. Of course, recumbents bypass the issue altogether with laid back padded seats that are nearly as comfortable as a barcalounger.

View the document

Bicycle Industry Looking Good

An article on the financial website Seeking Alpha paints a rosy picture for the future of the bicycle industry. The article states, “The global bicycle market shows significant growth revenues exceeding $61 Billion through 2011.” They list Dorel Industries (owner of Cannondale, Schwinn, GT and Monogoose), Giant, Trek, and Shimano as the leading global bicycle manufacturers. Aptly named Giant is the largest, with an 8% profit growth this year and global output expected to reach 10 million units by 2014. Electric bikes represent one of the fastest growing markets.

The article is an interesting read if you like this sort of thing.

Seeking Alpha article

Bike Arc

The Bike Arc “Half Arc” (shown above) is an interesting bike parking solution. Bike Arc produces other racks based on this same theme, from the simple “Rac Arc” (essentially a Half Arc without a cover), to the fully enclosed “Tube Arc” that is adaptable from 16 bikes to upwards of 60+ per unit.

From the Bike Arc website:

Innovative, sustainable and sculptural, the Bike Arc system just might be the smartest idea to hit transportation since the bicycle itself. Born out of a shared reverence for the bicycle and the environment, the design evolved from the collaborative efforts of celebrated U.S. bicycle advocate Jeff Selzer and Joseph Bellomo, an architect renowned for his leadership in holistic, green design.

Bike Arc

Running Errands

Bike by Pashley, bags by Queen Bee.

First Look: Breezer Finesse

Breezer Finesse Specs

Sacramento Bicycle Kitchen

The Sacramento Bicycle Kitchen is a volunteer-run, do-it-yourself bicycle maintenance and repair shop doing great work in the heart of Midtown Sacramento, CA.

We are a community of volunteers working to bring do-it-yourself bicycle maintenance, repair, and education to the people of Sacramento. We provide a space, tools, and staff to those interested in bicycle repair. We operate a shop at 1915 I Street in Sacramento and have operated in Sacramento since 2006. We are 100% volunteer-run and pay the bills through donations and paid services like classes and shop fees. If you want to meet a bunch of hard-working, dedicated people, please come on down during our regular hours. (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 6-9pm and Saturday 12-4pm)

Sacramento Bicycle Kitchen


 
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