Moots Comooter

A little eye-candy for you. I’m not sure about the viability of a titanium commuting bike that retails for $8750, but who am I to say? I guess if you have the money…

  • Frame: Titanium
  • Fork: Wound Up Cross
  • Bars: Moots Ti flat bars
  • Crank: Campy Chorus Carbon
  • Brakes: Magura Louise
  • Headset: Chris King
  • Stem: Moots Open Road
  • Seat Post: Moots Cinch
  • Saddle: Brooks Swallow
  • Front Hub: Schmidt Generator
  • Rear Hub: Rohloff
  • Rims: DT Swiss x470
  • Tires: Schwalbe Marathon
  • Fenders: Honjo
  • Rack: Tubus Cosmo
  • Lights: Schmidt EG, Busch & Muller Dtoplight

More photos here and here

Bike to Work Pants

Cordarounds, maker of the somewhat famous (and quirky) horizontal corduroy pants, launched their Bike to Work Pants today. From the outside, Bike to Work Pants look like any garden variety khaki, but inside they’re trimmed with Illuminite Teflon and 3M Scotchlite reflective material. By rolling up the cuffs and turning the pockets inside out, this common khaki is turned into a highly reflective safety pant.

From the Cordarounds website:

Bike pants make for silly work pants, and vice versa. So we set out to design a product for commuters that functioned equally well at both. Using fabrics like Illuminite Teflon and 3M Scotchlite we’ve bought reflectivity to regular trousers. They line the inner pantcuffs and rear pockets, allowing you to deploy added protection and reflection as you pedal off. The pant cuffs and mudflap pockets can be worn in 4 known ways. There are likely more, and we invite you to invent them.

Visit the Cordarounds website

No Bicycles Allowed

Many commercial buildings maintain a “no bicycles allowed” policy. Bike commuters who work in these buildings are faced with a dilemma: violate company policy by sneaking in your bike, or lock it on the street and hope it’s there at the end of the day. In many cases, a no-bicycles-allowed policy is written into the lease and the employer is at risk if they allow their employees to bring bikes into the building. Consequently, employees may be at risk of being reprimanded or even terminated if they violate the policy.

Many commercial buildings maintain a “no bicycles allowed” policy. Bike commuters that work in these buildings are faced with a dilemma: violate company policy by sneaking in your bike, or lock it on the street and hope it’s there at the end of the day.

For the past six months, my employer has been working with our landlord to come up with a bike parking solution in our building. We were technically in violation of our lease by bringing bikes into the building, but our landlord was overlooking the infractions as we worked on a solution. An in-building parking solution was never found, so even though there were no documented cases of damage due to bicycles, our landlord recently started enforcing the no-bikes-allowed policy. Fortunately, my employer was able to work a deal with the City to provide a bicycle parking “bullpen” (basically a fenced area with access granted only to bike commuters) in an adjacent parking garage. It’s not a perfect solution, but it beats on-street parking.

Often, landlords cite “building damage” and “liability” as reasons for restricting bicycle access; in my opinion these are groundless arguments. In large buildings, trash cans, dumpsters, cleaning carts, catering carts, hand trucks, and a whole host of other rolling objects are allowed in on a daily basis; all of these are more likely to damage a building than a bicycle. I believe the liability/damage argument is a red herring used to obfuscate the feeling held by some landlords that bicycles look unprofessional and are not proper decorum within modern office buildings.

Advocates in New York City are attacking the problem head on with the “Bikes in Buildings” bill. The bill would force commercial landlords to allow their tenants to bring bikes into their buildings. At a time when encouraging alternate modes of transportation is paramount, the bill makes great sense. Thirty members of the City Council have already signed on to the measure and advocates are pushing the Council to consider the bill this fall; it’ll be interesting to see if it passes.

Gallery: Andrea’s Dahon Speed Pro TT

I purchased my Dahon Speed Pro TT (2008) when my easy bike commute within DC changed into a 90-minute odyssey that involved a train, subway, and car.  I decided that the first thing I had to do was ditch the car, and then look for a way to shorten my trek from suburbia into DC each day.  Upon learning that folding bikes were allowed on the commuter train and Metro at all times, I immediately decided to get one. 

I purchased this Dahon after carefully considering several makes and models of folders.  I decided on the Speed Pro TT because of its speed (I can reach speeds comparable to what I do on my high-end road bike), easy folding (less than 30 seconds to fold/unfold), and relatively light weight (a mere 21 lbs).  Even though I am only five feet tall, the bike easily adjusts to fit me. 

I’ve had this bike for four months.  It made my commute far more flexible, as I am no longer held hostage to returning to wherever I left my car.  Now, my ”car” is always with me!  The folder can easily be brought on the train, subway, or bus at any time.  I can ride to the Metro station in the morning and take the subway into the city, and a commuter train home in the evenings.  Or vice versa.  This is very useful given the high degree of unreliability with commuter trains and Metro in the DC area.  I no longer use my car during the week (saving a considerable amount of gas money), and get plenty of exercise, riding anywhere from 10 to 25 miles daily.  Most importantly, I love every minute of it!  I never sit in traffic and my commute actually takes less time with my folder - 60 minutes each way total, from the steps of my front door to the chair in my office!  And don’t let those little wheels deceive you – this bike is FAST and nimble. —Andrea

Civia Loring Debuts

The Civia Loring was just introduced at Interbike. What a cool looking city bike! I love the “sustainable” bamboo fenders and rack slats, and it comes stock with a Brooks B-67 saddle and Pasela tires… WOW. Plus, I’ve heard nothing but good things about SRAM I-Motion internal gear hubs. I’m looking forward to riding one.

From the Civia website:

Whether tooling around town, cruising campus or pedaling to the grocer, the Civia Loring offers supreme comfort, safety and utility. From its gently sloping top tube to its bamboo fenders and matching trim, the Loring is a study in elegance, simplicity and fun. Designed for short runs of five miles or less, the Loring carries up to 50 pounds of cargo while delivering an exceptionally balanced ride. The Loring features disc brakes and a three or nine-speed internally geared hub.

I-Motion 9-Speed Build

  • MSRP: $1610
  • Fork: Loring Steel
  • Fenders: Loring Bamboo
  • Rear Rack: Loring Aluminum/Bamboo
  • Handlebar: Loring Swept 80º
  • Rims: Alex SX44 disc specific
  • Crank: Truativ 5D 3-piece
  • Brake Calipers: Avid BB5 mechanical disc
  • Wheel (Front): Civia disc hub, 36-hole, Alex SX44 rim
  • Wheel (Rear): SRAM i-motion 9, 36-hole, Alex SX44
  • Brake Levers: SRAM FR5
  • Headset: Cane Creek SC-1
  • Stem: Truativ XR 12º rise
  • Seatpost: Truativ XR 350mm
  • Kickstand: Single-leg kickstand
  • Saddle: Brooks B-67
  • Tires: Panaracer Pasela 26 x 1.75 with Tourgaurd flat protection

I-Motion 3-Speed Build

  • MSRP: $1380
  • Fork: Loring Steel
  • Fenders: Loring Bamboo
  • Rear Rack: Loring Aluminum/Bamboo
  • Handlebar: Loring Swept 80º
  • Rims: Alex SX44 disc specific
  • Crank: Truativ 5D 3-piece
  • Brake Calipers: Avid BB5 mechanical disc
  • Wheel (Front): Civia disc hub, 36-hole, Alex SX44 rim
  • Wheel (Rear): SRAM i-motion 9, 36-hole, Alex SX44
  • Brake Levers: SRAM FR5
  • Headset: Cane Creek SC-1
  • Stem: Truativ XR 12º rise
  • Seatpost: Truativ XR 350mm
  • Kickstand: Single-leg kickstand
  • Saddle: Brooks B-67
  • Tires: Panaracer Pasela 26 x 1.75 with Tourgaurd flat protection

Visit the Civia website

Interbike

Interbike, the bicycle industry’s largest trade show, kicks off tomorrow. Unfortunately I’m unable to make the show this year, so my coverage is going to be a bit spotty, but I’ll do my best to keep you abreast of interesting developments within the transportational cycling niche (I have friends at the show reporting for me). Besides keeping a general eye out for anything related to utility cycling, I’ll be looking specifically for developments in commuting bikes, cargo bikes, folding bikes, e-bikes, internal gear hubs, lighting systems, wet weather gear, and commuting-related accessories.

ASI Purchases Breezer

Joe Breeze

Breezer, maker of specialized commuter bikes, has been purchased by ASI. Founder and guru Joe Breeze will remain involved as a consultant. The agreement will enable him to keep a hand in the business while spending more time on new projects, design, and bike advocacy.

Via BRAIN:

PHILADELPHIA, PA (BRAIN)—Advanced Sports, Inc. (ASI) has purchased Breezer bikes. The purchase includes all assets and trademarks of the Breezer bicycle brand as well as an agreement with Joe Breeze for consulting services on new projects and designs.

Advanced Sports, Inc. is a marketing and distribution company that also owns the Fuji, SE, and Kestrel bicycle brands.

Read the full article
About Joe Breeze


 
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